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Volunteers needed for bald eagle research

January 11, 2008 12:00:00 AM PST
Want to do your part for the environment and protected wildlife? How about volunteering to count bald eagles?The U.S. Forest Service is conducting a bald eagle census in the San Bernardino Mountains to track the growing bird population, and no experience is necessary. Volunteers need to bring binoculars, a watch and dress warmly.

The eagle counts will be held Saturday morning, Jan. 12, as well as Feb. 9 and March 8, at Big Bear, Arrowhead, and Silverwood Lake.

Volunteers are stationed at various vantage points around the lakes where they map and note any eagle observations during the 1-hour period from 9:00 to 10:00 a.m.

Volunteers for Big Bear should come to the Forest Service Big Bear Discovery Center on North Shore Drive at 8:00 a.m. for instructions.

Volunteers for Arrowhead should go to the Sky Forest Ranger Station at 8:00 a.m. For more information, please call Ray Aguayo, Biologist at the Big Bear Ranger Station, (909) 382-2829.

Volunteers for Silverwood Lake State Park should contact the park office for information during business hours of 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at (760) 389-2281, and plan to meet at the Visitor Center at 8:00 a.m. Lake Silverwood State Park is also conducting Bald Eagle Barge Tours on weekends during the months of January and February, for reservations, which need to be made in advance, please contact the park office at (760) 389-2281.

Volunteers for Lake Hemet should contact Heidi Hoggan at (909) 382-2945 and plan on meeting at the Lake Hemet Grocery Store at 8:30 a.m. for intructions.

Discovery Tours to view bald eagles will be held each Saturday and Sunday and during holiday periods. The tours consist of an introductory slide show and a tour bus ride around Big Bear Lake to look for eagles. Binoculars and spotting scopes will be provided. Call ahead at (909) 382-2790 for reservations and information.

Current information regarding bald eagle migratory routes for these and other California eagles can be viewed from the University of Santa Cruz Predatory Bird Research Group's Web site at http://www2.ucsc.edu/~scpbrg/migration.htm.


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