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Coleman's ex-wife says they planned to re-wed

June 7, 2010 12:00:00 AM PDT
Gary Coleman's ex-wife calls their relationship "golden" and says that before his recent death they had planned to renew their marital vows. In an exclusive interview that aired on Monday's "Good Morning America," Shannon Price says she had ordered that Coleman be taken off of life support on the advice of his doctors.

The 42-year-old former child actor died May 28 in Utah after suffering a brain hemorrhage while home with Price two days earlier. Both their voices can be heard in the 911 recording.

On the tape Price can be heard frantically asking the emergency dispatcher to send help. Coleman was bleeding from the back of his head and "bubbling at the mouth" after falling.

"I asked him if he could make me some food. He went down there and then I heard this big smack," said Price. "I went down there and found him in a pool of blood."

Price says she's aware some people suspect she was involved in Coleman's death, but she emphatically denies contributing to the fall that put him into a coma and ultimately took his life.

"People can say whatever they want, I know the truth," said Price. "I would never hurt my husband. I would take my own life before I would ever harm him."

The couple, who were thought to be married, were actually divorced in 2008. But Price, who's been using a wheelchair lately because of seizures, claims she and Coleman were always in love and set to re-marry.

"We were going to renew our vows soon, but our health issues got in the way so we were unable to do that," said Price.

In the weeks leading up to his death, Coleman was voicing an animated movie called "Star Dumb." In his last interview, he talked about the downside of growing up in the limelight.

"Being a celebrity is always a burden. You are stuck with it for life, I don't care who you are," said Coleman. "You are going to die with it, even if you haven't worked in 20 years.

The actor starred for eight seasons on the sitcom "Diff'rent Strokes," starting in 1978.

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