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Girl attacked by female classmates at school

June 10, 2011 12:00:00 AM PDT
An Eyewitness News exclusive: a 13-year-old girl was allegedly targeted by fellow students, beaten and hospitalized. She spoke out from her hospital bed. Four students at her school have now been suspended.

The victim is in the intensive care unit at a Long Beach hospital after she was attacked by a group of girls at Charles Drew Middle School in South L.A. Her mother chose not to reveal her name.

The victim says one girl attacked her during P.E. period Thursday and several other girls joined in and beat her.

She says she does not understand why she was targeted but adds some of the girls had made it known for days that they did not like her. The victim, who could barely speak Friday, said she never thought they would beat her.

"She wanted to fight me and she did, and I don't know why," said the victim.

She says she curled up in a ball while the girls kicked and punched her. The 7th-grader suffered broken bones in her face. She says she was kicked in the eye and her parents are concerned injuries to their daughter's eye could affect her vision. There are numerous other injuries.

"I'm scared that she might do something," said the victim when asked about going back to school.

She says she's scared to go back to school because the girl who attacked her first might tell her friends and they might do something to her again.

"She was on the floor trying to cover her face, she felt more than one girl kicking her, but she cannot see who it was," said the victim's mother. "The only thing that she was hearing was the other kids saying, 'Yeah, kick her, kick her, kick her.' Why? Why? She's a good girl. She just tried to be friendly with everybody. Why? They were having a problem, but they didn't try to talk instead of kicking her like that. You don't do that to a person. You don't do that, not even to an animal. Why are they going to do that to a girl? Why?"

Experts say bullying has become an epidemic and cases like this are all too common.

"The highest incident rate is among young women," said bullying expert Terry Olivas-De La O. "Young women from ages 12 to 18 are the highest rate of one-on-one bullying."

De La O began going to schools to talk about bullying after her own daughter fell victim. She says signs parents need to look out for are changes in behavior and a child suddenly withdrawing.

Los Angeles Unified School District officials say four girls were involved in the attack and all four have been suspended from school. The attack is under investigation.


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