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Tape released of terrorist interrogation

October 19, 2011 4:23:05 PM PDT
David Headley is a Pakistani-American who helped plot the Mumbai massacre nearly three years ago. More than 160 people were killed during a several day seige of the Indian capital.

Clips from the FBI tape of Headley's interrogation were just released by federal prosecutors in Chicago but only after a judge's order.

The Chicago man who became public enemy number one in India is heard speaking publicly for the first time.

Headley scouted locations in Mumbai for Pakistani terrorists, in advance of the terror assault that began in late november 2008.

When the FBI in Chicago arrested Headley two years ago, he offered to cooperate to save himself from the death penalty and extradition overseas.

Headley is heard on the tape saying: "I want some, I mean would like, I know it doesn't matter what I want, but I'd like, from my eyes, I want some kind of bust to happen. I don't want to keep on?I mean I know you have plenty of evidence against me but really I'm just providing you more and more evidence against me and you aren't making any arrests."

During questioning, Headley was told that he had to tell authorities everything he knew and that any plea bargain would be based on the importance and quality of the information.

That is when Headley made a motion to suggest a Hail Mary pass and then decided to turn on his boyhood friend, Chicago travel agent Tahawwur Rana.

Headley would go on to get his plea deal in exchange for testifying against Rana, who was convicted in June.

Rana's attorney argued that Headley was motivated by desperation to save himself. But the jury didn't buy it.

Rana is eligible for up to 30 years in prison. A sentencing date hasn't been set.

The government argued that Headley's family would be endangered if the video was released. Judge Harry Leinenweber said he wasn't convinced of that. Wednesday's release of the tape came after a not for profit investigative journalism group, Pro-Publica, filed a court motion along with the PBS show Frontline.


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