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Conrad Murray trial: No verdict reached in first day of deliberations

November 4, 2011 12:00:00 AM PDT
Jurors in the involuntary manslaughter trial of Dr. Conrad Murray went home for the weekend after reaching no verdict during their first full day of deliberations.

The jury will resume deliberations Monday at 8:30 a.m.

Get complete coverage of the trial of Michael Jackson's doctor, Dr. Conrad Murray, who is charged with involuntary manslaughter.

Jurors, made up of five women and seven men, are sifting through six weeks of evidence and witness testimony, so a decision may not be a speedy one.

Criminal law professor Karen Smith says since it is a high-profile case, it could amplify a sense of duty. Then, there are the fine points of the law in the case. Among them, the jury must distinguish between ordinary carelessness and criminal negligence.

"Was it foreseeable things could go wrong?" Smith said.

Follow @abc7MurrayTrial on Twitter to get the latest updates on the involuntary manslaughter trial of Dr. Conrad Murray.

Another factor in deliberations is the jurors themselves. Eight of the 12 have served on juries before. Juror No. 2 has been on five cases, and the experience helps.

They are an educated group - one with a degree in biochemistry, and another with an MBA. Most have some college or professional training, which means they have patience on top of their sense of responsibility, according to Smith.

On the other hand, if the jury takes too long, it could signal that there is dissent among jurors, according to legal expert Dana Cole.

"After a couple days, one would think that maybe there is some dissent on the jury because it really is only one count, and the lines are so clearly drawn in this case," Cole said.

Murray appeared to be keeping calm on Friday. He was caught on tape walking around in Santa Monica. When asked how he was spending his time while the jury was deliberating, he said, "With friends and family, my children."

Outside the courthouse, crowds of people have gathered to voice their opinions on which way they think the verdict should go.

"I believe, now that all the facts have fallen, he will definitely be exonerated," said Beatrice Fakhrian, a Conrad Murray supporter.

Fakhrian said Murray attends church with her.

"We play golf together, we eat together, we pray together," she said.

But Myra Julliette, a supporter of the Jackson family, said an acquittal would be an injustice and a disgrace for the justice system.

"I want people to remember that Michael was a human being. His life was stolen from him. His children no longer have a dad," Julliette said.

Any verdict reached has to be unanimous. Murray, 58, has pleaded not guilty and has denied any wrongdoing. If convicted, he could face up to four years in prison and lose his medical license.

View photos from the involuntary manslaughter trial of Conrad Murray.


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