• BREAKING NEWS ABC shows live and on-demand -- Download the WATCH ABC app!

Jerry Sandusky judge: Jury could get case in few days

June 18, 2012 12:00:00 AM PDT
The judge in Jerry Sandusky's child sex abuse trial said the jury may receive the case as early as Thursday.

Judge John Cleland also told the 12 jurors and four alternates that the date is tentative, and that they should pack appropriately since they will be sequestered in a hotel.

Friends and former colleagues of Sandusky testified on Monday on behalf of the former Penn State assistant football coach. His defense is seeking to counter the prosecution witnesses' claims that he sexually abused boys in the shower on Penn State's campus.

The prosecution has rested its case, and now the defense has the floor. However, it remains unclear how the 68-year-old's defense team would proceed on Tuesday. When asked if he would testify on his own behalf, Sandusky did not respond.

Sandusky is charged with 51 counts of sexually abusing 10 boys over the span of 15 years. Earlier, prosecutors had dropped one of the counts, saying the statute he was charged under did not apply at the time of the alleged illegal contact. Sandusky denies any wrongdoing.

The mother of one of the alleged victims, known as Victim 9 by prosecutors, was the last witness called Monday before the prosecution wrapped up its case. She told the court that her son's underwear was frequently missing from the laundry and he'd tell her that he threw it away because he had an accident. The son had testified Thursday that Sandusky repeatedly forced him to have anal sex that resulted in bleeding.

The defense began presenting its case by calling former Penn State assistant coach Dick Anderson, who testified that he and other members of the football staff were present when Sandusky brought young boys into the team's showers. He said he never witnessed anything inappropriate.

Anderson, who coached at Penn State from 1970 to 1983 and again from 1990 to 2011, said adults and children often shower together at gyms. He said Sandusky had a "wonderful reputation" in the community and "he was well thought of in every regard."

Meantime, prosecutors had Sandusky examined by a psychologist on Sunday after the defense was allowed to introduce testimony that may suggest Sandusky suffers from a mental disorder.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.


Load Comments