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'Coregeous' puts focus on breathing to help tone your core

August 8, 2012 12:00:00 AM PDT
If you do abdominal work, you most likely know common exercises such as crunches, planks and bicycles. But it could be time to just take a deep breath to help you define your core.

"You can get unbelievable core tone without shredding or ripping or tearing yourself apart," said Jill Miller, creator of "Coregeous."

There are loads of ways to work towards a sassy six pack, yet Miller redefines abdominal workouts by starting from deep inside to out. That means addressing key core layers: your transverse abdominals and your respiratory diaphragm, which Miller said often gets left out in terms of abdominal training.

"If we haven't really tailored the innermost lining of our birthday suit, then the rest of the tissues are less responsive," said Miller.

Her techniques help to make the birthday suit strong and supple, allowing better movement in proper position while doing your favorite exercises.

"You're trying to get all your abdominal layers, the inners and the outers, going into a position of tension, so that you sleeve your spine in a good position no matter what that position is for the exercise," said Miller.

Miller has a great way with descriptions and words. Her term, tubular core activation, is a unique way of saying that you're going to tame your belly through your breath.

"Move your diaphragm fully. It goes down when you inhale at first and then as you continue to inhale, you start to use the rib cage muscles," said Miller.

Breathing deep pushes air initially downwards, and as deep breathing continues, there is intentional bloating and expanding of abdominals, chest cavity and lungs.

Her $20 DVD provides a how-to on these internal exercises, releasing scapular tension and other core work. It can be a bit challenging at first because we aren't used to engaging our cores this way.

"It's going to nurture your nervous system, help you recover, and to get in touch with these layers," said Miller.


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