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On tape, bank executive suing LAPD says he used bath salts '20 times'

October 15, 2012 12:00:00 AM PDT
A bank executive suing the Los Angeles Police Department for $50 million over claims that he was badly beaten by officers during a bizarre encounter told an officer in Glendale two days earlier that he had snorted bath salts and thought he was being followed by a helicopter.

Deutsche Bank Vice Chairman Brian Mulligan claims two LAPD officers used excessive force on him during his arrest in Highland Park on May 15.

While the County of Los Angeles Office of Independent Review and LAPD investigate Mulligan's complaint, his own words are being used by the Los Angeles Police Protective League, the police officers union, to assert that he is a liar, specifically regarding the use of the hallucinogenic street drug which may trigger paranoia and combative behavior.

The audio tape details an 11-minute conversation between a Glendale police officer and Mulligan, who said he was a "little paranoid" and started to question himself about how he acted.

Mulligan told the officer he bought "white lightning," a type of bath salts, and estimates he snorted them at least 20 times, according to the tape. He said the last time he used white lightning was approximately two weeks prior.

"How long does this stuff stay in your (expletive) system? How's it legal?" Mulligan asked the officer.

Mulligan's resume posted on the USC Marshall School of Business website cites high level jobs, such as a former co-chairman of Universal Studios and chief financial officer of Seagram Co.

Mulligan's attorney, Skip Miller, said the LAPPL was "slinging mud to divert attention from a horrific and illegal beating that their officers administered."

"It is asinine to think I would hit a police officer," Mulligan told Eyewitness News. "I am not that stupid."

The substance allegedly used by Mulligan is not illegal. He told the Glendale officer on tape that he was worried about getting in trouble.

"If I get involved, if I get as much as a misdemeanor, I'm done," Mulligan said. "I mean, I'm done."

The Associated Press contributed to this report.


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