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Prop. 40 an abandoned measure by both sides

November 3, 2012 12:00:00 AM PDT
From education funding to genetically engineered food, the propositions on the Nov. 6 ballot are grabbing headlines and stoking emotions, until Proposition 40 comes into discussion.

Prop. 40 initially was an effort to reject the state Senate redistricting map, which was put together by a non-partisan, independent commission. When those new district boundaries were released, California Republicans spent millions to get Prop. 40 on the ballot.

Gary Toebben, the president of the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce, said the state Republican Party determined that it didn't like the Senate districts, then they determined the Senate districts were OK.

Toebben said Prop. 40's backers abandoned the measure. That was months ago, but by that time, it was too late to withdraw the it from the ballot, said Raquel Beltran of the League of Women Voters.

That means Californians are still being asked to vote on it. But because the measure was written by a group that hoped to overturn the redistricting maps, there are concerns that people in favor of the new Senate districts will vote "no." However, a no vote actually supports Prop. 40's goal to toss out the redistricting maps.

Prop. 40 is a measure that neither political party wants, and that will still need to be deciphered by voters this election.


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