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Kairos Society empowering young entrepreneurs

Kairos Society founder Ankur Jain of Marina del Rey at the New York Stock Exchange in February 2013.
March 4, 2013 12:00:00 AM PST
At age 23, Ben Gulak has become wealthy through his brainchild, the DTV Shredder. It's part skateboard, part Segway and part tank. It can go 30 mph over sand, snow, mud and mountainous terrains.

"We've taken in $4.5 million in revenue in 30 days of being in production," Gulak says proudly.

Gulak credits the Kairos Society for introducing him to business leaders who invested millions in him. Kairos is nonprofit organization based in the U.S. It empowers young entrepreneurs from top universities around the world.

Gulak is now even working with the military on remote control technology to tows 800 pounds.

"Kairos, really, over the years has been the pivotal thing that's helped me get to this point," he said. "Before, I was worried about raising money to keep the lights on month to month. How am I going to make payroll?"

Ankur Jain of Marina del Rey founded Kairos when he was 18.

"You think to yourself, what would the world look like if the most influential people today were best friends 20 years ago?" Jain said.

Jain recruited students from 30 countries to work with mentors like Sir Richard Branson and former President Bill Clinton.

"Kairos transcends these boundaries because in our interdependent world there are no borders," Clinton says in a video.

They invite the 50 most innovative student start-ups from around the world. They call them the Kairos 50, and they bring them to the floor of the New York Stock Exchange to present their ideas to corporate leaders.

Among the 50 products is Alcohoot, the world's first smartphone breathalyzer, which connects to the phone.

There's also DiagnoseMe, an app which utilizes users' sweat to look for disease.

One, which is also an app, uses GPS to show if someone with similar interests is nearby.

Another app, Politify, shows how politicians' plans affect your personal bottom line.

There are also advancements in 3-D printing and music technology.

Alex Fiance, a USC and Agoura High School graduate, is Kairos' president. He's now coordinating brainstorming sessions all year long on issues like health care and education.

"These students want to solve problems and they are already solving problems in their own right," Fiance said. "The question is, which problems will they solve and what do you focus them on? How do you focus the next generation of entrepreneurs? That's what we do."


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