• BREAKING NEWS ABC shows live and on-demand -- Download the WATCH ABC app!

Daylight saving time: Tips for adjusting to time change

March 8, 2014 12:00:00 AM PST
Come Sunday, we will attempt to wake up an hour earlier. This can be brutal for the brain and body. It's no easy transition, but having a daylight saving plan in gear can make a world of difference.

Neuro reflex therapist Mark Kurganov says to start your routine a few days ahead of time. Each night, go to bed and get up 15 minutes earlier. Also, move the alarm far away so that you have to get up.

"It's important to focus on the routine. So I recommend my clients usually starting three or four days ahead of time and it makes the transition a lot easier," said Kurganov.

When it comes to a wakeup call, coffee is aromatic and stimulating, but dietitian Ashley Koff says you're better off fueling up for real energy.

"Energy comes from food, it comes from a nutrient balance of carbohydrate, protein and health fats - carbohydrate like [a] waffle and some healthy fat and protein from peanut butter," she said.

Koff likes a fruit veggie smoothie with hemp for protein, lemon and ginger to boost digestion. Eat quality meals and before bed, and she says magnesium is a must.

"Magnesium is the nutrient to help us go to bed a little bit earlier because it's going to turn off our fight or flight response," Koff said.

An hour before bed power down phone, computer, and TV. Make the room dark and cool. Kurganov has clients follow deep breathing and mind body techniques to wind down.

Kurganov also recommends this breathing exercise: Lie down and place your hands on the lower abdominal. Breathe deeply for four counts, and try to feel the hands elevate due to breath. Then, slowly exhale for four counts. Repeat three to four times, then move hands up to diaphragm. Again breathe for four counts, feeling hands rise and lower with the inhale and exhale. Finish with hands at chest doing the same four in, four out inhale and exhale format for three or four times. The body should be relaxed.

Often times right before you go to bed, you're usually thinking of all those things you have to do the next day. Kurganov says one of the best things you can do is write them down, and finish up with a declarative, positive statement so when you wake up, you'll act as such.

"If you give yourself a command, you're more likely to follow through," he said.


Load Comments