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LA mayoral candidates push for big voter turnout

April 26, 2013 12:00:00 AM PDT
With the Los Angeles mayoral race getting close, the two major candidates are using every chance to get their message out. The election is three and a half weeks away. Low voter turnout is expected and getting out the vote could be crucial for the candidates.

For mayoral candidates Wendy Greuel and Eric Garcetti, it is a fight for every vote.

Friday, Greuel visited the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising of Los Angeles to talk to students.

Garcetti went to Echo Park to talk about helping businesses.

Los Angeles city elections historically have low voter turnout, so every vote is critical.

"We need to remind people that who the next mayor of Los Angeles is impacts our lives every single day," said Greuel.

In the 2005 general election, turnout including absentee ballots was about 34 percent. In 2009 turnout for the primary was about 18 percent. This March the primary turnout was about 21 percent.

"I would hope that we get higher turnout, because it's not a tactical issue for me, it's an ethical issue for me," said Garcetti. "I want to have a city that votes."

With absentee ballots already arriving at people's homes, the candidates are advertising heavily on TV. Greuel has been on the air for more than a week. Garcetti started Wednesday and Friday released an ad in Spanish. They are both trying to motivate voters.

"I don't look at Election Day just being on May 21st," said Garcetti. "Election Day is today, because there are people right now at home watching this broadcast with their ballots in hand, and I want them to be inspired by my record of results."

"If you're an absentee voter, make sure you return your ballot. People are starting to return their ballots. Many of my friends have texted me with pictures of them filling the ballot out with my name on it," said Greuel.

An Eyewitness News Poll conducted by Survey USA shows 13 percent of voters are still undecided.


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