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Michael Jackson wrongful death trial: Prince Jackson to testify

June 25, 2013 12:00:00 AM PDT
Four years after a fatal dose of a surgical anesthetic, Michael Jackson's death is an active matter in court with his children in the spotlight.

In one legal action, his heirs are seeking $50 million each in general damages. In a separate court, a judge called for a report about Jackson's daughter, Paris, who attempted suicide three weeks ago. On Tuesday, the judge gave the all-clear to the guardians he appointed: Katherine Jackson and Paris' 34-year-old cousin, T.J.

"We are happy that the judge reviewing all the evidence felt that everything was appropriate and that Paris is getting the appropriate treatment that she needs," said Brian Panish, an attorney for the Jacksons.

Both Paris and Prince have been deposed on video. On Wednesday, Prince will testify in person during the family's wrongful death trial. The Jacksons claim that AEG hired and negligently supervised the singer's physician, Conrad Murray.

"He will bring back to the jury that there really are people involved in this case. It is not a large corporation and, too, that three children and a mother have lost someone who was near and dear to them," said Panish.

Both Paris and Prince were steps from their father's bedroom when Murray struggled to revive Jackson. But Panish says Prince's testimony will be less about the doctor and AEG and more about how the family has suffered.

"He knew Dr. Murray. Dr. Murray had treated the children one or two times. He had met Dr. Murray, obviously, but he was not involved in the treatment of his father," said Panish.

Prince's testimony will follow an expert for the plaintiffs, Dr. Gordon Matheson, who is an expert on sports medicine. Matheson said that, in his opinion, AEG erred in allowing Jackson to choose his own physician and that the company should have hired a team of independent specialists to assess and treat Jackson.

Under questioning by the AEG attorney, Matheson was asked about Murray's duty. Couldn't he call in specialists if he saw Jackson needed more help and didn't he have a choice in treating Jackson in a medically incorrect way?

Matheson's reply: "Yes, he could quit."

AEG denies wrongdoing and asserts that Murray's secret treatment of Jackson with propofol was bizarre and unforeseeable.

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