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Therapy dog found beaten up after being reported stolen - owner

July 1, 2013 12:00:00 AM PDT
"Bear," a German shepherd that does a lot of good for a lot of people as a therapy dog, has been found after being reported missing.

According to the dog's owner, Kris Herzog, Bear was found at a house on 82nd Street in Los Angeles. Herzog said the dog had a broken leg and appeared to be beaten up.

Herzog, a professional bodyguard known for being a fierce protector to the stars, said his German shepherd was snatched from his back yard on June 19.

"This is easily one of our saddest days," Herzog had said. "We feel like we've lost a part of the group, because Bear, although only 2-and-a-half years old, had gone to the VA hospitals and went to the families of U.S. veterans deployed or K.I.A., and spent time with them as a therapy dog."

Herzog said the German shepherd is gentle and loving, bringing joy to combat veterans and their families.

Bear was micro-chipped. Flyers were put up in the neighborhood asking for Bear's return. The Bodyguard Group offered a $10,000 reward for his safe return. By Monday evening the dog had been located and taken to a veterinarian.

"He is the biggest, sweetest dog in the world. He's so friendly and such a loving dog, he was easy to steal, and it didn't surprise me at all when the witness said that the gentleman that wrapped the rope around his neck and drug him down the street, it didn't surprise me that my dog didn't bite him or bite back because the dog was a big sweetheart, that's why he could run around a group of 50 children, they'd rub hot dogs over his face and he wouldn't bite anyone," said Herzog.

Because Bear was staying with Special Operations combat veterans, we can't tell you the exact address he was stolen from, but we can tell you it was in the area of 119th Street and Birch Avenue in Hawthorne.

"To someone who is a returning combat veteran and trying to re-acclimate to society, having that dog lick you in the face when you get off the plane, the same dog you used to play catch with before you deployed, it's a big deal," said Herzog. "As well as for the children, of course, of the deployed and K.I.A. veterans."


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