Many sunscreens do not meet water-resistant criteria, study finds

EMBED </>More News Videos

New research by the Journal of American Medical Association revealed that nearly one in three commonly purchased sunscreens do not meet the criteria of being water-resistant. (KABC)

New research by the Journal of American Medical Association revealed that nearly one in three commonly purchased sunscreens do not meet the criteria of being water-resistant.

Experts say that water-resistance is the most important factor in sunscreen in order to prevent skin damage and protect against skin cancer.

Unfortunately, when scientists searched Amazon.com using the keyword "sunscreen," people purchased products based on packaging and appearance rather than effectiveness. One in five Americans said that it is because of how sunscreen feels when it is applied on the skin.

Consumer Reports' sensory experts carefully tested a number of sunscreens to find products that most consumers would likely purchase.

During the testing, the sensory experts applied a quarter teaspoon of sunscreen on their arms and ranked the products based on scent, absorbency and overall feeling on the skin.

According to the study, 31 percent of consumers preferred a tropical, coconut scent and almost 50 percent preferred an unscented sunscreen.

Consumer Reports health editor Trisha Calvo said that after extensive testing, researchers were able to find sunscreens that were pleasant to apply and also offered good sun protection.

The Aveeno Protect + Hydrate SPF 30 and Walmart's Equate Sport Continuous Spray SPF 30 did not leave a shiny or greasy residue.

For those that want a scentless option, the Pure Sun Defense SPF 50 lotion tested positively. For those who prefer the tropical scent, Banana Boat SunComfort Continuous Spray SPF 50 proved a good pick.

According to a Consumer Reports survey, nearly half of Americans do not wear sunscreen, and women are more likely to use sunscreen than men - 57 percent compared with 43 percent.

If you still prefer not to use sunscreen, you can wear tightly woven clothing and a hat with a broad brim. Big sunglasses will protect your eyes and eyelids, but you may still need sunscreen to cover exposed skin.

The American Academy of Dermatology strongly urges Americans to use sunscreens that meet their guidelines to protect against harmful UV rays.
Related Topics:
healthsunscreenconsumer reportshealthy livinguvresearchsummersafety
(Copyright ©2016 KABC-TV. All Rights Reserved.)

Load Comments