Treatment using electrical discs may help with pain

EMBED </>More Videos

Proponents say Amino Neuro Frequency - using small discs to generate electric current - can help with pain, but doctors are skeptical. (KABC)

Known as Coach Q, Quentin Pullen is a trainer, massage therapist and retired Marine who had back pain for years.

"I was scheduled for surgery and started to do a lot of research to find out how I could make my back better," said Pullen.

He discovered some health experts using something called ANF or Amino Neuro Frequency therapy. It's a treatment where small discs are applied to certain body parts. The claim is that the discs emit electrical frequency when activated, due to body heat.

Pullen said his pain relief was immediate.

"One of the only ways we can quantify things is through our own personal experience," said Pullen.

He trained to be certified and now uses ANF with his massage and training sessions.

Carrie Foglesong found it relieved her Achilles tendon problems from marathon training.

"Better. A lot better," said the Fullerton resident.

Marian Curuia wasn't convinced it would help at first. He had knee pain after intense training at the police academy.

"I was pretty skeptical to be honest. It worked, though. I didn't believe it," said Curuia.

Now Curuia is pain free.

Coach Q says this is a class-one medical device and it is FDA licensed. There is no drug, there are no side effects. It might not help you, but it certainly won't hurt.

But doctor of physical therapy Andrew Pritikin says this program lacks the science to back it up.

"They're saying these dots come in and have an electrical charge that will give impulses to the nerves, but in order for that to occur, the dots have to have an electrical charge to conduct. You need a certain amount of conduction in order to do that," said Dr. Pritikin.

Pritikin acknowledges that we all produce electricity, but to make this work, we'd need an outside source of power for conduction.

"These dots don't have any external battery source so I don't understand how these things can actually work," said Pritikin.

Still, he applauds anything that appears to bring relief to those in pain.

"Placebo effects are great. If you feel it's working - great. But don't tell me it's science," Pritikin said.
Related Topics:
healthfood coachCircle of Healththerapyexercisefitness
(Copyright ©2018 KABC-TV. All Rights Reserved.)