ADHD meds help boost test scores

null It was the first long-term study on /*ADHD*/ and test scores. The study followed nearly 600 children from kindergarten to fifth grade.

Researchers found medicated children scored more than five points higher in reading and nearly three points higher in math. Researchers say that's equivalent to about two to three months of study.

"We're not trying to say in this study that medication is the only answer," said Richard Scheffler, the lead author and professor at the University of /*California at Berkeley's School of Public Health*/.

The researchers say other treatments ADHD children receive, including behavior therapy, can also help. But, the study, which appears in the journal, "Pediatrics," didn't look at those measures.

One expert, who was not involved with the new study, said she was impressed with the results.

"It doesn't mean that every child with ADHD should be taking medication," said Psychiatrist Dr. Bennett Leventhal, a /*University of Illinois-Chicago*/ psychiatry professor. However, Dr. Leventhal says previous studies have suggested that most affected kids can benefit from medication.

About 4 million children in the United States have been diagnosed with ADHD. About half of those children take stimulants to control extreme fidgetiness and impulsive behavior that's associated with attention deficit disorder medication.


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