World's first alternating dose COVID-19 vaccine study launches in UK

A lot of people who've gotten their first COVID-19 vaccine dose have asked, "Can I mix and match the vaccines?"

Right now, the CDC says no. If you get the Pfizer shot for round one, you'll need to get Pfizer for round two.

However, a new study into the topic could change things, depending on what is found.

The vaccine trial is happening out of the UK, and it's testing for several things.

The study, run by the National Immunisation Schedule Evaluation Consortium (NISEC) across eight National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) supported sites, will gather immunological evidence on different intervals between the first and second dose for a mixed-vaccine regimen.

The vaccine trial has been backed by 7 million pounds in government funding.

First, they're mixing and matching doses. Some people will get Pfizer for their first shot, and the AstraZeneca vaccine for the second shot, or vice versa.

Second, they'll be testing the timing between doses. Some people in the trial will get their two shots 28 days apart, and some will get them 12 weeks apart.

The following are all of the variables the trial will test:
  • Two doses of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine at 28 days apart
  • Two doses of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine at 12 weeks apart - as a control group
  • Two doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine at 28 days apart
  • Two doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine at 12 weeks apart - as a control group
  • The Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine for the first dose, followed by the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine for the second, at 28 days apart
  • The Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine for the first dose, followed by the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine for the second, at 12 weeks apart
  • The Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine for the first dose, followed by the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine for the second, at 28 days apart
  • The Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine for the first dose, followed by the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine for the second, at 12 weeks apart

In total, 800 people are participating in the trial in the UK.

The 13-month study will monitor the impact of the different dosing regimens on patients' immune responses.

The trial starts in a few weeks, and early results will start coming in this summer.

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