E-cigarettes could increase oral disease risk, UCLA study finds

ByABC7.com staff via KABC logo
Monday, June 27, 2016
In this July 16, 2015 file photo, Bruce Schillin exhales vapor from an e-cigarette at the Vapor Spot
In this July 16, 2015 file photo, Bruce Schillin exhales vapor from an e-cigarette at the Vapor Spot.
AP

LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- E-cigarettes could increase the risk of oral disease, according to a new study released by UCLA on Monday.

Researchers said e-cigarette vapor contains toxic substances and nanoparticles that could kill the top layer of skin cells in the oral cavity.

That can significantly weaken the oral cavity's natural defense mechanism, the study stated.

The research was conducted on cultured cells, but scientists believed similar results would happen in a human study.

The study concluded that e-cigarettes may not be significantly safer than tobacco cigarettes.

The findings were published online in the journal PLOS One and also suggested that health care providers do more to raise public awareness of the products' health risks.