What does legal marijuana mean for those with prior pot convictions?

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Now that marijuana has been legalized in California for recreational use, what does it mean for those who were convicted on pot charges? (KABC)

Now that marijuana has been legalized in California for recreational use, what does it mean for those who have been imprisoned on pot charges?

Not much, according to one law professor.

Proposition 64, which legalized marijuana, did not apply retroactively to those who have already been convicted for possession.

However, the new law could help someone on probation for marijuana possession make their case to a judge, Loyola criminal law professor Stan Goldman said.

"Someone could theoretically walk into a judge's courtroom and ask that judge if they would take them off probation," Goldman said.

"Because although the law doesn't require it or mention anything about it, it just seems fair that someone not have to suffer consequences for having been convicted of something that today is no longer a crime."

It is possible to get prior convictions expunged from your record.

But that doesn't mean they're completely gone.

In some cases, you'll still have to disclose that to an employer.
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