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Public hearings held for low-income housing

Policies will be re-evaluated
April 13, 2008 12:00:00 AM PDT
Los Angeles has enough vacant or underused land to accommodate the 113,000 new housing units needed in the next five years to house the city's growing population, it was reported Sunday. Twenty-five percent of the new housing need is for low-income families, but most development in the city is aimed at high-income renters or buyers, according to a city study that was reported on by the Daily News Sunday.

Public hearings will be held this spring on a city development plan called the Housing Element, which assesses the need and charts city policies designed to meet it.

The new unit construction "is doable, but not easily doable," principal planner Jane Blumenfield of the City of Los Angeles told the Daily News.

The construction goal comes as residents in some suburban areas are voicing unhappiness with L.A. policies aimed at concentrating dense development along transit lines and arterial streets.

And the study's release also came at a time that housing advocates at UCLA said the city has fallen behind in meeting the need for low-income housing, with just one fifth of the needed units built between 1998-2005.

And in the same period, 9,000 rental units were converted to condominiums, making it more difficult for renters to find affordable housing, housing advocates said.

 

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