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2 new machines to get you crazy for cardio

July 8, 2010 12:00:00 AM PDT
There are all kinds of ways to get our cardio conditioning in each week, but let's face it, doing the treadmill or elliptical on a continual basis gets a bit monotonous."If you're going to the gym and just training the same muscles after a while it's going to get boring. And if you're brain is already bored, believe me your body was bored long, long ago," said personal trainer Gunnar Peterson.

Boredom is the kiss of death for any workout program. In response, the fitness industry churns out all kinds of tools to keep us on our game, like the Helix.

"The Helix is a terrific tool. It's working laterally. It's changing your position in space from high to low. It's working inner thigh, outer thigh, but it's also challenging you from a balance standpoint," said Peterson.

Trainer to stars, athletes and others, Gunnar Peterson fills his gym with what works. He says the Helix is no gimmick.

"It's training the weak points, shoring up those weak links so you prevent injury down the line or at least you're less likely to be injured," said Peterson.

Helix users get the most out of it by working both outwards and inwards to tax adductors, abductors, hips and buns all the while getting a killer cardio workout.

In the past 20 years, cycling meant going slow, fast, standing or sitting - well not anymore. We're not locked down. We're taking pedaling to a whole different angle.

"We can turn, we can lean, and work on our functional training and our balance and coordination. You're not locked in one position, you're not on a rigid, fixed, static piece of equipment. The bike is constantly floating," said Colin Irving, a former competitive cyclist and CEO of RealRyder.

Irving says many cyclists don't feel a standard indoor cycling bike represents the benefits of an outdoor bicycle. His RealRyder company created a bike that angles 20 degrees - similar to real racing. The extra leaning changes fitness benefits for the better.

"There's a constant core engagement activation - all of your stabilizer muscles in your legs. You burn about 20 percent more calories even at moderate workloads," said Irving.

Both machines cost well over $1,000 so it's smart to try them before you buy. Irving offers free classes at the Santa Monica airpark, while the Helix is popping up at select gym across the Southland.

Locations where people can try the Helix:

Pole Position Fitness
3100 E Willow St.
Long Beach, CA 90755

Reel Fitness
12215 Ventura Boulevard Suite 107
Studio City, CA 91604-2533

Fitness Quest
1601 10th St.
Reedley, CA 93654


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