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Michael Jackson trial: Former security chief continues testimony

August 5, 2013 12:00:00 AM PDT
Michael Jackson's former head of security continued his testimony in the star's wrongful death trial on Monday. He says he raised concerns with Jackson's doctors about over-prescribed drugs.

If Jackson was dependent on medications seven years before his death, would he have been able to perform in many shows and videos during that time period? Jackson attorney Debra Chang showed jurors the star in the spotlight from 2001 to 2004.

The plaintiffs claim that Jackson did not have any serious drug problems until years later, in 2009, and only because Jackson partnered with AEG Live for his comeback tour and Conrad Murray was selected to be his personal physician.

The videos were played to rebut the testimony of Michael La Perruque, a former Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy and Jackson's head of security during the time period when the videos were shot.

La Perruque had testified that at least a dozen times, Jackson appeared under the influence of an unknown substance. He detailed one episode in 2002 when Jackson passed out and his children called 911.

Under cross examination, La Perruque said he was unaware of Jackson's pain from scalp treatments. About the 911 incident, La Perruque said he was not in the room when paramedics treated Jackson and that he had no reason to believe that the incident was related to drugs.

AEG's defense elicited from La Perruque that Jackson's incidents of apparent inebriation seemed to escalate in 2004, Jackson's trial and acquittal in Santa Barbara on molestation charges.

Regarding the videos shot before then, La Perruque told the jury that Jackson was never unable to perform because of intoxication or drug-use.

The Jackson attorneys claim that AEG should compensate Katherine Jackson for her son's loss and that the pop star could have made as much as $1.6 billion if he had agreed to a global tour.

On Monday, AEG consultant Eric Briggs rejected the plaintiff's figures, calling them imaginary. He also said that Jackson's history with drugs and sedation shortened his life expectancy.

The Jackson attorneys argued that there was pent up demand for Jackson concerts and that fans would buy up tickets like never before.

On Tuesday, jurors may hear from the pop star's brother, Randy Jackson.

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