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LAX dry-ice bombs: Suspect released on own recognizance

An LAX dry-ice bomb suspect has been set free without posting bail, but he is still facing felony charges.
November 18, 2013 12:00:00 AM PST
An airport employee accused in the dry ice bomb explosions at Los Angeles International Airport has been set free without posting bail, but he is still facing felony charges.

Dicarlo Bennett, 28, one of two men charged with setting off dry ice bombs at the airport, was released on his own recognizance by a judge Monday afternoon.

Bennett was locked up since last month's dry-ice explosions at LAX. Bennett, a grounds worker at the airport for Servisair, is accused of setting off dry-ice explosions in an employee restroom at the airport as well as causing another explosion that occurred on a tarmac outside the international terminal.

Bennett was charged with two felony counts of possessing and exploding a destructive device near an aircraft. His bail was initially set at $1 million.

The D.A. in the case said in court Monday that given Bennett has no criminal record, no one was injured in the blasts that occurred in areas of the airport only accessible to employees, Bennett should be released on his own recognizance.

"As the D.A. indicated, there was no personal injury, there was not even paint chipped on the lavatory where the bomb supposedly went off, where the dry ice supposedly went off," said attorney Ben Wasserman.

In all, four dry-ice devices were found at the airport, and two of them went off. Police had previously said they didn't believe the explosions were an act of terror but could be the work of a disgruntled employee.

The bombs were made by putting dry ice in 20-ounce plastic bottles. Police say they could have caused serious injury to anyone in close proximity.

A second suspect in the dry-ice explosions, 41-year-old Miguel Iniguez, who was a supervisor for Servisair, was charged with one felony count of possession of a destructive device near an airplane. He was released on bail.

"Nobody was making a bomb or trying to test a bomb or a device or anyting," said Wasserman. "There is a legitimate reason why this was all happening, why it happened, and hopefully we will get to that position in a timely manner."

Investigators maintain they believe Bennett set off the dry-ice bombs out of curiosity, because he thought it was funny.

Bennett is due back in court next month.


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