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Octuplets: Services donated; money scarce

March 12, 2009 12:00:00 AM PDT
The La Habra house that will soon be home for Nadya Suleman and her 14 children was undergoing big changes Thursday. Some area businesses have donated materials to update the home. But other promises of help for her octuplets have dried up. At the house, workers have been streaming in and out of the house all day. There was wide speculation that Nadya Suleman would be at the home Thursday. She missed an appointment she had with social workers and hospital staff for a home visit that was scheduled at the house Wednesday. According to certain paparazzi, Suleman has been out shopping and at some point, in Whittier, they lost her. Meantime though there's been some disappointing news, her mother shared it with ABC7 earlier Thursday.

"Yes, they'll be very comfortable," said Angela Suleman, Nadya's mother.

Angela Suleman completed her walk-through of the La Habra home Thursday. Painting, flooring and upgrades are in the works. Materials and services all donated.

"I'm not doing this for Nadya, I'm doing this for the kids," said Jerry Morgan, Uptown Flooring. "There's eight kids, I think all of us have kids and I think you need to keep that in perspective. The kids need help."

"Well, I walk in there and I see the walls dirty and things, and you know, I just don't want to have those kids like that," said John Gunnison, Republic Windows.

And the octuplets' grandmother is grateful.

"They're each human beings that need to be well taken care of and we are doing our best," said Angela Suleman.

Yet as one hand gives, another takes away. Companies had offered the octuplets baby formula and other necessities. Suleman says negative publicity about her daughter shot down that deal.

"My daughter was promised, you know, formula and diapers. It was all rescinded because of public opinion, and that's really too bad because they're punishing her," said Angela Suleman. "They're not punishing her, they're punishing the babies. Nothing's coming."

Other donations are also up in the air. Angels In Waiting, a charity group of neonatal nurses, has volunteered to train a brigade of nannies. But they need nearly $400,000 to do the job. They face a formidable fundraising task.

According to the California Attorney General, the non-profit company grossed $5,000 last year. Their total assets: $600.

"Oh the nurses, I don't think they will need a nurse by the time the babies come back, they'll be fine," said Angela Suleman.

The hospital says the next home visit will come some time after all this work is done, but it's not known how long that will take. The babies' homecoming will be put on hold as well.


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