• BREAKING NEWS ABC shows live and on-demand -- Download the WATCH ABC app!

Pakistan to give US access to Osama bin Laden's wives

May 10, 2011 12:00:00 AM PDT
A U.S. official said Pakistan will soon give the U.S. access to three of Osama bin Laden's wives.

Pakistan has granted the U.S. to speak with the women despite tensions between the two countries over the unannounced raid on bin Laden's compound in Pakistan.

Since bin Laden's death, the women along with their children have been in the custody of the Pakistani army. The White House said the women could provide information on bin Laden's life in hiding.

Meantime, the Navy SEALs who raided the compound were ready to fight their way out of Pakistan if necessary. According to the New York Times, two extra helicopters accompanied the mission. The SEALs escaped undetected.

Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf has also denied allegations that his administration struck a deal with the U.S. years ago to let American special forces kill or capture bin Laden inside Pakistan.

The denial follows a report in a British newspaper that the U.S. and Pakistan reached a secret deal nearly a decade ago allowing the U.S. to conduct operations against bin Laden and two other top al Qaeda leaders on Pakistani soil.

"Pervez Musharraf has seen a media report, and let me make it clear that no such agreement had been signed during his tenure," said Musharraf's spokesman Fawad Chaudhry. "Also, there was no verbal understanding."

In a report published Thursday, The Guardian newspaper, quoting U.S. officials and retired Pakistani officials, said Musharraf and former President George W. Bush struck the agreement after bin Laden escaped U.S. forces in the mountains of Tora Bora in late 2001.

If such a raid were conducted, the agreement was that Pakistani officials would publicly denounce the U.S. unilateral action.

"The Guardian report is baseless," Chaudhry said.

Bin Laden's fourth son, 30-year-old Omar, says he left his father in disgust the year before the Sept. 11 attacks. But he told ABC News in a 2008 interview that he still cared for him.

In written statements on Tuesday, Omar and other family members condemned the U.S. raid that killed bin Laden, calling it an "assassination" of an unarmed man in violation of international law."

The Associated Press contributed to this story

Load Comments