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CrossFit training growing in popularity

July 6, 2009 12:00:00 AM PDT
There are those who are content putting in a moderate 30 minutes on the treadmill, but then there are others looking to push the envelope. It's those people who might be interested in a fast-growing program called CrossFit that's bringing "old-school" workouts to the forefront. "We don't use machines. We don't use treadmills. We don't use any of those things. What we do is use functional training. So if you need to do it in real life you're going do it in here," said Terry Hudson, CrossFit.

Terry Hudson is talking about a training program used by military worldwide called CrossFit.

"There's over a thousand affiliates right now worldwide from the United States all over to Afghanistan to Iraq, everywhere," said Hudson.

And scores of CrossFit enthusiasts right here in the states with goals of a different sort.

Lindsey Benson is a competitive Olympic weight-lifter. Michael McMillan is a collegiate soccer player. Yet the rest of this crew like Carrie Rogers are desk jockeys and moms.

"I am a business person who works behind a desk all day. And I love working out," said Rogers.

"I am a sales manager and I am on the road a lot. I have three kids. I have every excuse not to work out, but I find time," said Jason Friedman.

"I'm a mother of four. And I came here about a year ago to get in shape. Couldn't do any pull-ups, only five sit-ups. And now I can do lots, 15 in a row probably," said Mindith Rahmat.

Twenty-minute fast and furious sessions and a workout that's not repeated for three months rule out boredom.

The bare-bones approach appeals to many who want a good solid program, but don't need the fancy bells and whistles of a typical health club. They even post the workouts online so you can do it at home or wherever you are.

"You can go to CrossFit.com and follow the program absolutely free," said Hudson.

But Hudson cautions you have to have a clear understanding of some of the movements, along with the motivation to do stuff like this, as each session involves a rigorous circuit that's performed three times through.

"Some of the stuff is just basic P.E. stuff, pull-ups, push-ups, jumping jacks -- that type of stuff. But, some of the more hard-core stuff, you do need some training on," said Hudson.

Monthly classes start at $50 up to $250 for privates. Or, do it free in our garage -- although many feel camaraderie is needed.

"You got another guy beside you who's the same age as you and he's kicking your butt, so it kind of motivates you a little bit to keep working hard," said Hudson.

The third annual CrossFit Games are coming up July 10-12 in Aromas, California. They determine who holds the title of the "World's Fittest Man."

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