Miriam Hernandez
Miriam Hernandez is a general assignment reporter for ABC7 Eyewitness News.

Miriam was born in Santa Barbara and raised in Santa Paula. When she was 12 years old, she got her first paying job writing a weekly youth column for the Santa Paula Daily Chronicle. In college, she studied anthropology and theater at UCLA, earning her Bachelor of Arts degree. She was awarded her master's degree in communications at the University of Minnesota.

Her television career was launched at the NBC affiliate in San Diego. She has worked in Los Angeles, Washington, D.C. and New York reporting for CNN, USA TODAY ON TV, WUSA and Good Morning America. She joined ABC7 in 1998.

Miriam has covered the Mexico City earthquake, political turmoil in Central America, and the Oklahoma City bombing. She was the first reporter allowed by the U.S. Marshal Service to take a TV camera behind the vaulted doors of the Federal Witness Protection Program.

Miriam was named by Hispanic Magazine as one of the top 100 women in communications. She's won several Valley Press awards and Emmy nominations.

Follow Miriam on social media:
Facebook.com/abc7miriam
Twitter.com/abc7miriam
Instagram.com/abc7miriam


Contact:
ABC7 Broadcast Center
Attn: Miriam Hernandez
500 Circle Seven Drive
Glendale, CA 91201
818-863-7777

Archive
A legal odyssey for a bereaved family and a defendant who went on a stabbing rampage climaxed in court Friday as the attacker pleaded no contest and was sentenced to 14 years in prison.
For decades, audiences got to see the recording of iconic shows such as "The Price is Right" at CBS Television City, but now there are reports the property may be up for bid.
Travelers who bought tickets for Caribbean cruises may be in for a shock: They are not able to get refunds for trips that are taking them to hurricane-stricken areas.
Five houses remain heavily damaged Thursday after a nearby garage exploded the day before, sending debris flying into other yards and homes in West Hills.
The Los Angeles Unified School District agreed Thursday to pay $150 million to settle a lawsuit filed on behalf of "high-need students" at 50 secondary and high schools.