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Schools crack down on 'freak dancing'

October 26, 2009 12:00:00 AM PDT
A local high school looking to crack down on sexually suggestive moves at school dances has come up with a solution to have students sign "dance contracts."The "Sponge Bob," the "Jerk" and the "Reject" are some of the popular dances of today's urban youth that won't get students in trouble at Downey High School.

However, there are other types of sexually explicit dances called, "freak dancing," that Downey High School and other schools are cracking down on.

"Some people are too dirty, like they get too sexual and stuff and it doesn't look good on the school," said Alicia Zamano, a Downey student.

"It got to the point where it was simulated sex on the dance floor, and we needed to make a stand on it," said Tom Houts, Downey High School's principal.

Administrators say that the inappropriate style of dancing has become a growing problem in school-sponsored dances. So they came up with the solution to require every student to sign a dance contract when attending a formal dance, agreeing not to dance inappropriately.

"You can't have a female turn around and the boy rub against her, and they boy's hands need to be in the appropriate place," said Houts.

Each student attending the dances will be required to wear a wrist band. With the first warning that you're dancing inappropriately, the wrist band gets snipped off. With the second warning, the student gets ejected from the dance. All of this patrolling is done by a group called the Freak Patrol.

"We have four ladies that are like the drill sergeant types, and they're not afraid to speak up and say what the rules are and get between these kids and really give them stern warnings," said Gordon Weisenburger, the director of school activities at Downey High School.

Parents are having mixed reactions, and so are students.

"I think it's pretty cool that they're trying to protect for our safety," said Stefani Lang, a Downey student.

"I completely disagree, simply because I feel that when you go to a party or when you go to a school dance, you should be free to express yourself within a limit," said Rosa Mendoza, a parent.

School administrators say that they hope the contracts will keep the students dancing and busting the right kind of moves.


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