US Air Force demonstration team prepares to soar over Super Bowl at SoFi Stadium

The formation includes five different aircraft, each representing eras in the Air Force's 75-year history.

Tony Cabrera Image
Sunday, February 13, 2022
EMBED <>More Videos

SUPER BOWL 2022: Before kickoff, all eyes will be on the sky as a demonstration team from the U.S. Air Force soars over the big game at SoFi Stadium.

INGLEWOOD, Calif. (KABC) -- Before kickoff, all eyes will be on the sky as a demonstration team with the U.S. Air Force soars over the Super Bowl at SoFi Stadium.

"We'll be blasting about 30 minutes before the game starts, and the idea is, the national anthem's playing, being sung live, and then we're going to fly over as the flagship national anthem ends," said Major Kristin "BEO" Wolfe of the F-22 Demonstration Team.

The team will take off from Los Alamitos with a formation that includes five different aircraft - each representing eras in the Air Force's 75-year history.

"This is the first time we've had all five aircraft flying in formation in a public demonstration," said Major Joshua "Cabo" Gunderson, commander the F-22 Demonstration Team. "But with our heritage, our legacy in the Air Force shapes our culture, and it's a really impressive history of people that have served before us. We're thankful to be a part of it."

"To honor everybody with this flyover, not only the Air Force, but any military branch to look up and see everything that we have to offer from a World War II plane that's going to be leading the formation, all the way to the latest and greatest fighter," Wolfe said.

For these pilots, it's a huge honor - not just to represent the military on a national stage but also to fly over the game of the year.

"I'm from Tampa originally, so when the Bucs were knocked out of the Super Bowl, I was a little bummed, but nonetheless, it's a really cool opportunity to fly the Super Bowl, and my family is absolutely excited," Gunderson said.

"I think they're more excited than I am. Just to see and know that someone they're related to or that they know is up there in that airplane," Wolfe said.